Really? I mean really?

Posted on October 17, 2017

This is a real headline from a real newsletter I received this morning: “Higher ed leaders discuss free speech at closed-door meeting,” based on an article in Inside Higher Ed (https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2017/10/16/college-presidents-and-provosts-gather-consider-issues-free-speech).

Now I know that typically we present you with the most compelling reasons to take action and get back to school. Could be financial, personal or professional. We believe to our core that getting moving will change your life. Our platform was built to empower your role in that school-student relationship.

And that is why we created www.WhatsBestforMe.com.

But this headline and story is just too ridiculous to ignore – particularly for advocates of education and students, A meeting about “free speech” held in a “closed-door meeting” at a university? It’s gotta be an April Fool’s joke.

But, alas it is neither April nor a joke!

Even worse, at least optically, is that students were not invited; only executives. Wasn’t the point of the meeting to have a constructive dialogue to identify the problem and explore solutions? Students do outnumber faculty and administrators by a factor of 20; so why not include them in a true discussion?

To be clear, this meeting – and dozens more like it around the country — is about the internal conflicts between controversial speech and controlled environments. This is about school executives often being more concerned about lowering the volume and avoiding litigation than discussing these real issues and providing an outcome-based education for “traditional” and “non-traditional” learners alike.

So here’s today’s message – as you consider which school to choose, think about what they say vs what they do.

At www.WhatsBestforMe.com our advice is simple: choose the college, university, career school or certification program that best matches your needs and your view of the world. If nothing else, let’s turn this ridiculous “problem” into an astonishing “solution.” The whole point of going to school – as a first-timer at 18 or a returner at 38 – is to learn, listen and apply both to the rest of your life…personal and professional.

How does the school that we connect with you rank on that scale for you?